Seattle-Tacoma to Receive 'Hardest Working Cities' Award on August 4

Awards event to include State Senator Pam Roach and NHRA drivers John Force, Matt Hagan

SEATTLE-TACOMA (July 11, 2016) — Seattle-Tacoma has been identified to receive the Freightliner Trucks Hardest Working Cities award, which honors cities fueling growth and innovation. The recognition program by Freightliner Trucks came after an economic data review revealed a compelling relationship between investments in work trucks and thriving economies.

Seattle-Tacoma's strong work truck presence indicates substantial employment in construction and manufacturing, which helped place the cities in the top 20% in North America for contribution to gross domestic product. Investments in projects such as the $470 million Seattle-Tacoma International Airport renovation, WSDOT's I-5 overhaul, and Port of Seattle's expanded international arrivals facility demonstrate why Seattle-Tacoma will receive this award.

“It's an honor for our city to be awarded the ‘Hardest Working Cities’ title,” said Alex Bernasconi, general manager, Valley Freightliner. “The area's major construction projects really illustrate our dedication to growth. We're a city that's not afraid to get our hands dirty!”

As part of Seattle-Tacoma's recognition, a formal award presentation will be held Thursday, August 4, at noon at Valley Freightliner Pacific with State Senator Pam Roach. National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) drivers John Force and Matt Hagan will also make a special appearance at the event.

Prior to the award presentation, Freightliner will make several surprise gift and food deliveries at work sites around the area to thank crews for their contributions to Seattle-Tacoma. Previous work site visits have included major road construction projects, public works garages, and refuse facilities. To date, Freightliner has visited 20 work sites and thanked close to 1,000 workers across eight cities.

“This recognition program is a great way to celebrate the people working behind their cities growth,” said Mary Aufdemberg, director of product marketing, Daimler Trucks North America. “It's important to acknowledge cities like Seattle and Tacoma because they represent our economies moving forward.”

To find the Freightliner Trucks Hardest Working Cities, approximately 400 metropolitan census areas in the United States and Canada in 11 different data categories were reviewed. The data categories ranged from impact on overall gross domestic product to growth in employment to the number of jobs in key industry sectors including construction, manufacturing and logistics.

Since the launch of the program last year, eight cities across North America have been awarded the title: Dallas, Edmonton, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Nashville, New York City, Salt Lake City, and Toronto.

To learn more about Freightliner Trucks Hardest Working Cities, visit HardestWorkingCities.com

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